Sell with Confidence
Read More
News

Council advances on coastal protection

By Ellie Boswell

After scoring an A- in the latest Healthy Land and Water report card looking into the health of Moreton Bay waterways, Council will send Cr Brooke Savige (Div 1) as a representative to the Pumicestone Catchment Convergence 2021 to continue this excellent work.

Mayor Peter Flannery said helping coastal environments and estuaries thrive was a focus for Council, especially in the face of rapid population growth.

“This conference is a unique opportunity to understand the latest science, hear from preeminent experts and work with industry-leaders to continue the positive work we’ve delivered to improve our water quality and health,” he said.

“Our waterways are a massive drawcard for tourists, so we need our bay not only looking great but supporting a healthy ecosystem for wildlife.

“That’s why we’ve started developing a Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy (CHAS) to ensure our valuable coastal and riverine community assets continue to function as healthy systems.

“I urge everyone to have their say on this survey to help Council, service providers, residents and the wider community plan for the impacts of coastal change and make better decisions to mitigates those risks.”

Division 1 Councillor Brooke Savige said she looks forward to learning the latest industry knowledge at the Pumicestone Catchment Convergence next month.

“I can’t think of a more precious waterway than the iconic Pumicestone Passage given its importance to our local ecosystem — providing vital habitat for fish, dugong, turtles, crabs, a range of local and migratory birds, and plenty more,” Cr Savige said.

“I look forward to learning how we can work together with industry and the community to conserve and restore this special area for us all.

“We’ve come a long way in improving the health of this waterway, we’ve embraced new initiates like oyster shell recycling and pioneered new technology like the biodegradable artificial reef made from potato starch — but there’s always more we can do!”

The Pumicestone Catchment Convergence 2021 will be held on 16-18 February at the USC Sunshine Coast University to share knowledge on the unique Pumicestone Passage and its catchment, and review the action plan to ensure its healthy future.

Find out more about the Coastal Hazard Adaptation Strategy (CHAS) and complete the community values survey before Sunday 7 March: www.mbrc.qld.gov.au/CHAS

Up to Date

Latest News

  • Green thumbs plant 1000 native trees in three hours

    Another 1000 native trees were planted in just three hours at North Harbour’s Tree Planting Day thanks to the hard work of the local community. More than 200 locals of all ages gathered at the North Harbour Heritage Precinct for the community’s latest Tree Planting Day this month. Families, politicians and the North … Read more

    Read Full Post

  • Borders reopening in time for Christmas

    Queensland borders are expected to reopen to interstate travellers in time for Christmas. Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk says the state is expected to reach the milestone of 70 percent of eligible people fully vaccinated on November 17, but if we hit the mark earlier she will ease restrictions earlier. From November … Read more

    Read Full Post